Shire hors

History

SHIRE HORSE FACTS:

Shire horses are thought to be the descendants of the Old English Great Horse and the Friesian Horse. During medieval times, the Old English Great Horse was used as a cavalry horse before being retired to draft work. The Old English Great horse was likely then bred with Friesians, which were brought to England from the Netherlands to help drain the fens. These two breeds are likely the ancestors of what became the Shire horse, a breed that possessed the strength required to pull carts across the rugged English countryside. After WWII, the demand for draft horses plummeted, and by 1959, only 25 Shires existed in the US registry. There were once an estimated one million Shire horses worldwide, but today it is an at risk species, with only an estimated global population of 2,000.

es are thought to be the descendants of the Old English Great Horse and the Friesian Horse. During medieval times, the Old English Great Horse was used as a cavalry horse before being retired to draft work. The Old English Great horse was likely then bred with Friesians, which were brought to England from the Netherlands to help drain the fens. These two breeds are likely the ancestors of what became the Shire horse, a breed that possessed the strength required to pull carts across the rugged English countryside. After WWII, the demand for draft horses plummeted, and by 1959, only 25 Shires existed in the US registry. There were once an estimated one million Shire horses worldwide, but today it is an at risk species, with only an estimated global population of 2,000.

ought to be the descendants of the Old English Great Horse and the Friesian Horse. During medieval times, the Old English Great Horse was used as a cavalry horse before being retired to draft work. The Old English Great horse was likely then bred with Friesians, which were brought to England from the Netherlands to help drain the fens. These two breeds are likely the ancestors of what became the Shire horse, a breed that possessed the strength required to pull carts across the rugged English countryside. After WWII, the demand for draft horses plummeted, and by 1959, only 25 Shires existed in the US registry. There were once an estimated one million Shire horses worldwide, but today it is an at risk species, with only an estimated global population of 2,000.